Wolf Administration Announces More Than $8 Million in Funding to Support Water and Sewer Projects in 22 Counties

first_imgWolf Administration Announces More Than $8 Million in Funding to Support Water and Sewer Projects in 22 Counties August 19, 2020 SHARE Email Facebook Twittercenter_img Economy, Infrastructure, Press Release Governor Tom Wolf announced the approval of more than $8 million in funding to support H2O PA Flood Control, High Hazard Dams, and Water, Sanitary Sewer, and Stormwater projects through the Commonwealth Financing Authority (CFA).“Investments in our water and sewer systems preserve Pennsylvania’s infrastructure and the health of our communities,” said Gov. Wolf. “My administration is committed to the health and safety of residents in all corners of the commonwealth, and the funding approved yesterday will benefit communities for years to come.”The H2O PA program provides for single-year and multi-year grants for the construction of drinking water, sanitary sewer and storm sewer projects; the construction or renovation of flood control projects; and the repair or rehabilitation of high-hazard unsafe dams.The H2O PA projects approved during the CFA meeting are:Flood ControlThe Turtle Creek maintenance project in Allegheny County was approved for $100,000 to remove sediment and clear vegetation on the bank of Turtle Creek. This project will restore the design level of flood protection and safeguard the lives and property of Turtle Creek Watershed residents.The City of Dubois Sandy Lick Creek Stream rehabilitation project in Clearfield County was approved for $710,000 to restore the streambank, remove the gravel bar and for engineering.The Borough of Clarks Summit Watershed Flood Control and Protection project in Lackawanna County was approved for $200,000 to implement Urban Stream Restoration, re-constrict the streambed, reinforce portions of the streambed with rock armoring and natural vegetation, and construct stone weirs and natural pools. This project will also reestablish the hydraulic cross-section and alignment of this corridor.The Rice Township Ice Ponds Dam project in Luzerne County was approved for $508,833 to dewater the lake per Pennsylvania Fish and Boat Commission specifications, install a watertight cofferdam, dewater the remaining lake between the cofferdam and the spillway, bore a 24-inch diameter hole through the bottom of the dam, install a metal sleeve and a valve gate, pass all engineering and Department of Environmental Protection inspections, refill the lake, leave the cofferdam in place, clear the spillway and achieve certification that the dam is compliant with Pennsylvania law.The Dupont Borough Phase II Flood Mitigation Control Rehabilitation project in Luzerne County was approved for $507,926 to repair concrete joints, repair sections in need, and for maintenance to prevent lifting of concrete sections, water eroding underneath the concrete slabs, deteriorating concrete on the wave reduction walls, failing gaskets, and missing grout in joints. The funds will be used to support construction, engineering and permitting.The total funding for these projects is just over $2 million.High Hazard DamsThe City of Reading Egleman’s Lower Dam Modification project in Berks County was approved for $350,000 to lower the elevation of the dam by four feet and raise the bottom of the pond by four to five feet, to create a water depth of three to four feet, which is the depth necessary for growing bass. The principal spillway will also be modified to regulate the average water level. The overall water surface area of the pond will be reduced by 25 percent. The modifications are aimed at reducing the dam hazard classification from high hazard to low hazard.Water, Sewer, and StormThe 47 approved projects include stormwater and sewer line upgrades, wastewater treatment plant upgrades, street stormwater improvements, sanitary sewer line replacements and more across 22 counties throughout the commonwealth.A complete list of H2O projects is available.For more information about DCED and the CFA, visit dced.pa.gov.Ver esta página en español.last_img read more

Agents ‘go live’ to help Thailand

first_imgPlace Graceville director Brad Robson.“I’ve been out of training for a little while and this was the perfect excuse to get me back on the bike and back training again.” The 2018 bike ride delivered more than $25,000 to Hands Across the Water in Thailand.“To help bridge this gap, I created Digital Live, a six month coaching program that includes a full day workshop at Queensland University of Technology with some of Australia’s most knowledgeable digital coaches,” he said.“In 2018 over $30,000 was raised for our charity partner Hands Across The Water which helps disadvantaged children with their education.“I will be riding with 20 real estate agents 500kms across Thailand to deliver this money, plus an additional $100,000 of sponsorship donations.”Mr Carroll said he expected more than 200 real estate professionals to sign up for the program and all profits would be donated and delivered to the charity in Thailand in May next year. The home that will save lives The first two riders to sign up included Lauren Hampson, a sales administrator from Ray White Noosa, and the director of Place Graceville Brad Robson. In 2019, Digital Live founder and REA industry relations director Steve Carroll will expand the concept across the country, and ride 500km through Thailand in an effort to quadruple the funds raised for the charity. Mr Carroll said many Queensland real estate agents and property managers missed out on the huge opportunity that social media and digital marketing offered. Fearful tenants living in pest-infested squalor Hands Across the Water founder Peter Baines will join the ride, and Mr Robson said the chance to spend a week with such an inspirational man, as well as many other great leaders was a once in a lifetime opportunity.“More than that, I get the opportunity to raise money for an exceptional cause,” he said. More from newsParks and wildlife the new lust-haves post coronavirus15 hours agoNoosa’s best beachfront penthouse is about to hit the market15 hours agoRay White Noosa sales administrator Lauren Hampson is participating in the Digital Live Bike Ride in 2019.This will be the first time Ms Hampson has attempted a ride like this before, and said she was doing it to provide Thai children and communities with the same support Australians had in achieving their goals. >>FOLLOW EMILY BLACK ON FACEBOOK<<center_img Developer pays it forward Place Graceville director Brad Robson will participate in the 2019 Digital Live Bike Ride.For Mr Robson, who only first picked up a road bike in 2016, he loved the concept and jumped on board straight away.“I picked up a road bike for the first time in February 2016, trained hard for 12 months to compete in the Taupo Ironman and I haven’t picked up the bike since,” he said. Some of the action from the 2018 bike ride.In 2018, Digital Live raised more than $25,000 for charity Hands Across the Water to support the ongoing education of disadvantaged children and their communities in Thailand. Northside dominates most affordable and liveable list RELATED: Ray White Noosa sales administrator Lauren Hampson.“This could be anything from living in a safe home, making more friends, going to school, getting a job, or even graduating university — a small portion of the opportunities Hands Across the Water have managed to provide the Thai community over the past 13 years,” she said.While this will be the first time Ms Hampson would attempt a ride like this, she said she wasn’t a stranger to the sport.“My parents were triathletes growing up and we travelled a lot to participate in a variety of events, including the Noosa Triathlon, WA Ironman, New York Marathon, and Cairns to Karumba, which involved cycling 780km over seven days,” she said. MORE:last_img read more