Warner home set up for family living

first_imgThe home at 35 Sonata Drive, Warner.“It’s quite a low-maintenance yard, which is a good thing as I’m no green thumb.“It’s also a great home for entertaining. It’s got a nice big patio with fan. We’ve had many get-togethers out there.” The home has an open-plan living, dining and kitchen area that opens through sliding doors to the covered patio. The kitchen has timber look benchtops, wall oven, gas cooking, dishwasher and pantry.More from newsLand grab sees 12 Sandstone Lakes homesites sell in a week21 Jun 2020Tropical haven walking distance from the surf9 Oct 2019There is also a rumpus area off the living area, and a separate lounge room. The kitchen at 35 Sonata Drive, Warner.The master bedroom has a walk-in robe and an ensuite with double-sized shower. The three remaining bedrooms have built-in robes and the family bathroom has a separate bath and shower. There is also a study and a laundry with external access. The home has LED lighting, fans, security screens and high ceilings throughout. The home at 35 Sonata Drive, Warner.There is also a double lockup garage with internal access at the front of the home. Outside there are established, low-maintenance gardens and an automatic irrigation system for the lawns on the fully fenced, 674sq m block. Mr White said the home was in a quiet, friendly neighbourhood. “Everyone gets along on the street and we all look out for each other,” he said. The property is being marketed by Kerry Marks, of Harcourts North Lakes, for $569,000.center_img The home at 35 Sonata Drive, Warner.THIS spacious lowset home on a big block is on the market in Warner.The property at 35 Sonata Drive is well set up for family living with four bedrooms, multiple living areas and a big entertainment space.Michael White has owned the property for about seven years and said it was a great home for his family of four. “I love the size of the house and the yard,” he said. last_img read more

NZ Muslim Community: We ask the PM and MPs to oppose euthanasia

first_imgAnd perhaps most importantly, legalising euthanasia may provide the societal acceptance needed by those with suicidal tendencies in our communities to rationalise committing suicide.Passing this legislation will be tantamount to saying to our terminally ill and disabled that their lives are less valuable to the society compared to the youthful.If patients or those in pain currently can refuse treatment and die naturally as a result, why should legislation be enacted to legalise euthanasia, when it in turn places so much risk on already vulnerable members of our communities. 25 June 2019Family First Comment:“As a community we implore our elected democratic Ministers of Parliament to join us to also oppose euthanasia – and to instead focus our efforts on how to better support and care for every New Zealander. It is not for us or doctors to kill or aid others in destroying themselves. Our predominantly immigrated community will be made vulnerable under the proposed bill.”|Protect.org.nzFIANZ, the voice of New Zealand’s Muslim community since 1979, is opposed to euthanasia and the End of Life Choice Bill. We give voice to our concerns on behalf of our community.As New Zealand Muslims, we are worried that the vulnerability of our community members could be exploited if euthanasia is legalised by Parliament.Islam considers all human life sacred. Life is to be protected and promoted and not terminated prematurely. It is neither permissible in Islam to kill another human being, nor even to kill one’s own self. God Says, “Do not take life, which God made sacred…” (Qur’an 17:33), and “Nor kill (or destroy) yourselves…” (Qur’an 4:29-30).As a community we implore our elected democratic Ministers of Parliament to join us to also oppose euthanasia – and to instead focus our efforts on how to better support and care for every New Zealander. It is not for us or doctors to kill or aid others in destroying themselves.Our predominantly immigrated community will be made vulnerable under the proposed bill. We outline seven key areas of concern for your consideration:Most of our community immigrated from countries where authorities are hardly questioned. We are worried that they could be suggested, pressured or coerced by authoritative figures like doctors to end their lives if they had terminal illness or disabilities.We are concerned making euthanasia legal here will normalise it for future generations and erode our cultural identity.Many of our community are much poorer compared to others in society – some having come as refugees. In cases of severe illness where health care costs are high and carers are scarce, members of the community could request euthanasia out of guilt – as many are already conditioned into thinking they are an economic burden to the society – as a way of relieving the society of their burden.Due to the high unemployment rate in our community, legalising euthanasia could make it easier for unscrupulous members of poor families to pressure terminally ill relatives to request euthanasia as a way of relieving the family of their physical and economic burden. Persons in our community who are in extreme pain and clouded by depression, shock and grief could make irrational decisions due to their conditions and request their own death by euthanasia – not giving themselves time for possible recovery or coming to terms with their condition.center_img If euthanasia were legalised, the taxes we pay to the government would be used to train and deliver the act of euthanasia – making us as taxpayers complicit in this.last_img read more