Worsening of Lorenzo Sanz’s health status due to coronavirus.

first_imgThe son of the former Madrid president indicated that his father, 76, “He followed the protocol that exists” in the face of the possible contagion of the disease. “He spent several days at home, a little out of solidarity, because he looked feverish, but more symptoms had to be expected and when they arrived it was when they decided to take him to the hospital yesterday, where they admitted him with bilateral pneumonia in which he could take risks”, he pointed. The state of the former president of Real Madrid, Lorenzo Sanz, hospitalized in Madrid for the coronavirus, has suddenly worsened this afternoon after suffering kidney failure, pathology prior to admission. In addition, he suffers from hypertension, which has aggravated his delicate state of health.Lorenzo Sanz’s state of health from coronavirus worsens.“We just talked to the doctor and the news is not good. In addition to respiratory failure, kidney failure is associated with severe infection. You have to wait 24 hours but due to its age it is very complicated. The worst thing is not being able to be with him“Lorenzo Sanz Durán has written on his Twitter accountThe new news provided by the doctors has surprised his family. “Okay and it’s been a good night”, Lorenzo Sanz junior reported this morning through social networks. Dear Lorenzo Sanz, all our support and best wishes. A lot of strength and a lot of encouragement from the entire great Madrid family. #Real Madrid– Real Madrid C.F.⚽ (@realmadrid) March 18, 2020Lorenzo Sanz Durán wanted to thank all the “samples of affection” that he and his family have received, both from Madrid fans and from non-Real Madrid players and the effort of all the health personnel at the Jiménez Díaz Foundation in Madrid, where his father is admitted, as in “both public and private hospitals to help all those who are in trouble.” Real Madrid sent a message of encouragement to the former white president through his social networks.last_img read more

RIKEN announces penalties related to stem cell fiasco

first_imgEven though she has already resigned, RIKEN judged Obokata’s actions worthy of dismissal for cause. TOKYO—RIKEN, the network of nationally supported Japanese labs, today handed out disciplinary measures for those involved in the STAP stem cell scandal who remain under its authority.The actions result from nearly a year’s worth of investigations centered on an article and a letter published online in Nature on 29 January 2014 that described a new and extremely simple way of generating stem cells called stimulus-triggered acquisition of pluripotency, or STAP. Nature retracted the papers last July. Even before the retraction, a RIKEN panel found lead author Haruko Obokata guilty of research misconduct for fabricated and falsified images. Investigators also concluded that several of Obokata’s supervisors bore a heavy responsibility for the mess because of their lax oversight. Obokata resigned in December after failing to reproduce her research results. Also in December, a RIKEN investigative team concluded that STAP cells never existed and that indications of pluripotency reported in experiments likely resulted from contamination of cell lines.Sign up for our daily newsletterGet more great content like this delivered right to you!Country *AfghanistanAland IslandsAlbaniaAlgeriaAndorraAngolaAnguillaAntarcticaAntigua and BarbudaArgentinaArmeniaArubaAustraliaAustriaAzerbaijanBahamasBahrainBangladeshBarbadosBelarusBelgiumBelizeBeninBermudaBhutanBolivia, Plurinational State ofBonaire, Sint Eustatius and SabaBosnia and HerzegovinaBotswanaBouvet IslandBrazilBritish Indian Ocean TerritoryBrunei DarussalamBulgariaBurkina FasoBurundiCambodiaCameroonCanadaCape VerdeCayman IslandsCentral African RepublicChadChileChinaChristmas IslandCocos (Keeling) IslandsColombiaComorosCongoCongo, The Democratic Republic of theCook IslandsCosta RicaCote D’IvoireCroatiaCubaCuraçaoCyprusCzech RepublicDenmarkDjiboutiDominicaDominican RepublicEcuadorEgyptEl SalvadorEquatorial GuineaEritreaEstoniaEthiopiaFalkland Islands (Malvinas)Faroe IslandsFijiFinlandFranceFrench GuianaFrench PolynesiaFrench Southern TerritoriesGabonGambiaGeorgiaGermanyGhanaGibraltarGreeceGreenlandGrenadaGuadeloupeGuatemalaGuernseyGuineaGuinea-BissauGuyanaHaitiHeard Island and Mcdonald IslandsHoly See (Vatican City State)HondurasHong KongHungaryIcelandIndiaIndonesiaIran, Islamic Republic ofIraqIrelandIsle of ManIsraelItalyJamaicaJapanJerseyJordanKazakhstanKenyaKiribatiKorea, Democratic People’s Republic ofKorea, Republic ofKuwaitKyrgyzstanLao People’s Democratic RepublicLatviaLebanonLesothoLiberiaLibyan Arab JamahiriyaLiechtensteinLithuaniaLuxembourgMacaoMacedonia, The Former Yugoslav Republic ofMadagascarMalawiMalaysiaMaldivesMaliMaltaMartiniqueMauritaniaMauritiusMayotteMexicoMoldova, Republic ofMonacoMongoliaMontenegroMontserratMoroccoMozambiqueMyanmarNamibiaNauruNepalNetherlandsNew CaledoniaNew ZealandNicaraguaNigerNigeriaNiueNorfolk IslandNorwayOmanPakistanPalestinianPanamaPapua New GuineaParaguayPeruPhilippinesPitcairnPolandPortugalQatarReunionRomaniaRussian FederationRWANDASaint Barthélemy Saint Helena, Ascension and Tristan da CunhaSaint Kitts and NevisSaint LuciaSaint Martin (French part)Saint Pierre and MiquelonSaint Vincent and the GrenadinesSamoaSan MarinoSao Tome and PrincipeSaudi ArabiaSenegalSerbiaSeychellesSierra LeoneSingaporeSint Maarten (Dutch part)SlovakiaSloveniaSolomon IslandsSomaliaSouth AfricaSouth Georgia and the South Sandwich IslandsSouth SudanSpainSri LankaSudanSurinameSvalbard and Jan MayenSwazilandSwedenSwitzerlandSyrian Arab RepublicTaiwanTajikistanTanzania, United Republic ofThailandTimor-LesteTogoTokelauTongaTrinidad and TobagoTunisiaTurkeyTurkmenistanTurks and Caicos IslandsTuvaluUgandaUkraineUnited Arab EmiratesUnited KingdomUnited StatesUruguayUzbekistanVanuatuVenezuela, Bolivarian Republic ofVietnamVirgin Islands, BritishWallis and FutunaWestern SaharaYemenZambiaZimbabweI also wish to receive emails from AAAS/Science and Science advertisers, including information on products, services and special offers which may include but are not limited to news, careers information & upcoming events.Required fields are included by an asterisk(*)According to a statement released today (in Japanese here), the following disciplinary measures were taken in accordance with RIKEN regulations:Masatoshi Takeichi, the former head of RIKEN’s Center for Developmental Biology (CDB), has received an official reprimand. He will voluntarily return 10% of 3 months’ worth of salary. Takeichi is still an adviser to CDB, which has been reorganized in the wake of the scandal. Hitoshi Niwa, a co-author of the problematic papers and formerly a project leader, is also receiving a written reprimand. He remains on the staff. center_img For his role in the affair, Teruhiko Wakayama, a co-author who left RIKEN for a position at the University of Yamanashi before the papers were published, should have been suspended for cause, according to RIKEN. RIKEN also revoked his ongoing appointment as an associate researcher.Another co-author who oversaw Obokata’s work, Yoshiki Sasai, committed suicide last August.In a written statement also released today, Takeichi said that as head of CDB he bore “a heavy responsibility” for not catching in advance such unsuitable publications. He “solemnly accepted the punishment” and said he would work to promote research integrity. A RIKEN representative told ScienceInsider that there are a few bits of business related to the scandal still under investigation. One is whether RIKEN should return related research funds to the government. Another is whether to withdraw patent applications on the STAP technique filed jointly with Harvard University. Obokata initiated her work on STAP cells while a postdoc in the lab of Charles Vacanti, a tissue engineer at Brigham and Women’s Hospital in Boston, an affiliate of Harvard Medical School. RIKEN is also pursuing an action plan to prevent future lapses in research ethics throughout its system.last_img read more

Researchers uncover novel approach for treating neuropathic pain

first_img Source:http://www.utu.fi/en/news/news/Pages/International-Collaboration-between-U.S.-and-Finnish-Researchers-Identifies-New-Approach-for-Treating-Neuropathic-Pain.aspx May 4 2018Neuropathic pain is the chronic, pathological pain that continues even when the cause of pain is removed. Causes include damage to nerve cells and medicines used to treat cancer. A collaboration between research groups from Indiana University in Bloomington, USA and Turku Centre for Biotechnology in Finland has discovered a novel therapeutic that appears to interrupt the signaling cascades in the body required for multiple forms of neuropathic pain.Neuropathic pain is extremely common, affecting up to 5-10% of the population globally, and no cures or effective treatments are currently available. Moreover, chemotherapy-induced pain can be so extreme that it causes some patients with cancer to discontinue treatment and greatly impairs quality of life in survivors.Prior to this study, researchers were aware that pathological pain is triggered by a biological pathway that is activated by binding of the excitatory transmitter glutamate to receptors called NMDARs. This process then triggers activation of an enzyme neuronal nitric oxide synthase (nNOS) that generates nitric oxide gas that plays a role in aberrant pain sensation. However, experimental drugs designed to block either the NMDAR receptor or the nNOS enzyme can cause intolerable side effects, such as memory impairment and motor dysfunction.Related StoriesVitamin D supplementation may not reduce the risk of heart diseaseOpioid overdose deaths on the decline says CDC but the real picture may still be grimResearch reveals how mirror therapy relieves phantom limb painNow, researchers from Indiana University in Bloomington, USA and the Turku Centre for Biotechnology in Finland have demonstrated that an experimental molecule reduces neuropathic pain in rodents resulting from either nerve damage or a common chemotherapy drug.The team in the University of Turku in Finland was able to design the molecule after discovering that a protein, NOS1AP, that is downstream of nNOS, triggers several biological pathways that are associated with abnormal glutamate signaling, including neuropathic pain.The Indiana University group demonstrated that an experimental molecule designed by the Turku group to prevent nNOS signalling to NOS1AP reduced two forms of neuropathic pain in rodents. These forms of pain develop as result of either chemotherapeutic agent paclitaxel or nerve damage.The treatment also disrupted markers of nociceptive signaling in the spinal cord when the test drug was injected at that site into mice. Importantly, the NOS1AP inhibitor did not cause typical motor side effects observed with previous experimental molecules that directly target NMDARs.- Importantly, the chemical that prevents this signalling did not cause the negative side effects observed in previous experiments. Our studies suggest that the nNOS-NOS1AP interaction site is a previously unrecognized target for pain therapies”, says Professor Andrea Hohmann from the Indiana University in Bloomington.The results suggest that the protein NOS1AP might be a valuable novel target in the development of more effective medicines to treat neuropathic pain.- NOS1AP should be studied in more detail to find the best way to prevent this protein from contributing to chronic pain, said Senior Researcher Michael Courtney from the University of Turku.last_img read more