Flour Mills Nigeria PLC (FLOURM.ng) 2013 Abridged Report

first_imgFlour Mills Nigeria PLC (FLOURM.ng) listed on the Nigerian Stock Exchange under the Food sector has released it’s 2013 abridged results.For more information about Flour Mills Nigeria PLC (FLOURM.ng) reports, abridged reports, interim earnings results and earnings presentations, visit the Flour Mills Nigeria PLC (FLOURM.ng) company page on AfricanFinancials.Document: Flour Mills Nigeria PLC (FLOURM.ng) 2013 abridged results.Company ProfileFlour Mills Nigeria Plc is a flour milling company in Nigeria with business interests in food production, packaging, agricultural industries, port operations and logistics and real estate. The company manufactures and sells past, noodle, edible oil and refined sugar as well as livestock feeds; supplies fertiliser; manufactures and markets laminated woven polypropylene sacks and flexible packing material; and grows and processes sugar cane, oil palm, fresh tropical fruit, poultry and cassava. Business interests in ports operations and logistics include operating Terminal A and B at the Apapa port and offering customs clearing, forwarding and shipping agents and logistics services. Flour Mills Nigeria Plc owns and manages real estate in Nigeria. The company is a subsidiary of Excelsior Shipping Company Limited. Its head office is in Lagos, Nigeria. Flour Mills Nigeria Plc is listed on the Nigerian Stock Exchangelast_img read more

E-Tranzact International Plc (ETRANZ.ng) HY2015 Interim Report

first_imgE-Tranzact International Plc (ETRANZ.ng) listed on the Nigerian Stock Exchange under the Technology sector has released it’s 2015 interim results for the half year.For more information about E-Tranzact International Plc (ETRANZ.ng) reports, abridged reports, interim earnings results and earnings presentations, visit the E-Tranzact International Plc (ETRANZ.ng) company page on AfricanFinancials.Document: E-Tranzact International Plc (ETRANZ.ng) 2015 interim results for the half year.Company ProfileE-Tranzact International Plc is a technology company in Nigeria offering services for electronic transaction switching and payment processing. The company has operations in Nigeria, Ghana, Kenya, Zimbabwe, South Africa, Cote d’Ivoire and the United Kingdom. E-Tranzact International Plc has established partnerships with universities, government authorities, parastatals, financial institutions, technology firms and aviation companies offering solutions for everything from cash dispensing machines and international money transfers to payments of salaries and third parties. BankIT is an alternative payment option that is accessible through multiple electronic channels; eTranzact CorporatePay allows private organisations and government agencies to automatically handle third party and salary payments; mCommerce is a mobile banking application; eRemit is an online international money transfer service; eTranzact Strong Authentication provides two-factor authentication for ATM, POS, mobile and web transactions; ATM CardlexCash is a global payment network; eTranzact WebConnect accepts and processes merchant payments; eTranzact PayOutlet allows merchants to collect payments from customers through eTranzact branches. eTranzact International is a subsidiary of eTranzact Global Limited. Its head office is in Lagos, Nigeria. E-Tranzact International Plc is listed on the Nigerian Stock Exchangelast_img read more

Super Rugby: Who is in line for the play-offs?

first_imgFor the latest Rugby World subscription offers click here and find out how to download the digital edition here. By Alex ShawTo coin a phrase from legendary former Manchester United manager Sir Alex Ferguson, it’s squeaky bum time in Super Rugby.With just two rounds of regular season games left to play, teams from all over the southern hemisphere are jockeying for position in the imminent playoffs. With the new conference system that has been brought in as a result of teams from Japan and Argentina being added to the competition, there is plenty still to play for, particularly in Australasia.In South Africa, the winners of the Africa 1 and 2 conferences have been decided. The Stormers top Africa 1 with 41 points and though mathematically the Bulls, who sit in second with 32 points, could catch them, it’s extremely unlikely. The Stormers finish up their season with games away to Western Force and at home to the Kings and given the form they are in, it’s safe to say that they will pick up at least one win and secure Africa 1. In fact, they don’t even need a win, a draw or two losing bonus points would do it.The Lions, meanwhile, have wrapped up Africa 2 with two games left to play, sitting pretty at the top with a competition-high 47 points and the Sharks, on 35 points and second in Africa 2, are unable to catch them.Old friends: The Stormers’ Eben Etzebeth gets re-acquainted with Bok team-mate, Lood de JagerThere is, however, one wildcard spot up for grabs across the two African conferences and that will be hotly contested by the Bulls and Sharks. The Sharks take a three-point advantage into the final two rounds, where they will welcome the Cheetahs and Sunwolves to Durban. The Bulls face the same opposition, first hosting the Sunwolves before heading to Bloemfontein to take on the Cheetahs. The Sharks will be favourites for the wildcard as a result, with the Bulls hoping that one of the two teams can upset the odds and beat the Sharks in Durban. Based on the form of the Cheetahs and Sunwolves this season, it’s a fairly forlorn hope for those in Pretoria.The Stormers and Lions have been comfortably the best two teams in South Africa this season and by wrapping up their respective conferences, have secured themselves home quarter-finals in the playoffs. Trying to discern which of the New Zealand and Australian sides will join them, however, is a much trickier prospect.The New Zealand conference is particularly hard to read. The Chiefs currently sit atop the conference with 46 points, whilst the Crusaders, Hurricanes and Highlanders are all hot on their heels, with 45, 44 and 43 points respectively. Those three chasing sides all currently sit in wildcard spots and as a result, only the Brumbies, who top the Australian conference with 39 points, would make the playoffs from Australia. The Waratahs also have 39 points, but the Brumbies take the spot as stands by the virtue of having more wins than their rivals from Sydney.Leading from the front: All Blacks captain Kieran Read keeps the Highlanders defence busyConfused yet? If not, these permutations of how things may end up might just tip you over the edge.This week the Chiefs head to Queensland to take on the Reds and the Brumbies head to Auckland to meet the Blues. Both games are winnable for the conference leaders but they will be challenging to say the least. Elsewhere, the Crusaders host the Rebels, the Highlanders travel to Argentina to play the Jaguares and the Waratahs and Hurricanes meet in Sydney in a game that could all but end the Australian side’s season. A loss for the ‘Tahs to the Hurricanes and a Brumbies win in Auckland would be a nail in the coffin for Daryl Gibson’s men.Then, heading into the final week, there are a plethora of potentially winner-takes-all fixtures, including two mouth-watering New Zealand derbies. The Highlanders host the Chiefs and the Crusaders meet with the Hurricanes in Christchurch, with all four teams potentially still being in a position to top the conference. With home advantage in both of their final fixtures (Rebels and Hurricanes), the Crusaders are a strong candidate to emerge atop the conference log when all is said and done.Inspiration: David Pocock is due back from injury to drive the Brumbies play-off pushAs for the Australian sides, the Brumbies will welcome the Force to Canberra in a match they will be hopeful of securing at least four points, whilst the Waratahs will head to New Zealand to meet the Blues. Given the form of the Kiwi franchises this season and the fact the Waratahs finish up their season facing two of them, including one in New Zealand, they will be hard-pressed to usurp the Brumbies atop the Australian conference and, somewhat counter-intuitively, even more hard-pressed to overtake one of the chasing New Zealand pack in the wildcard spots. LATEST RUGBY WORLD MAGAZINE SUBSCRIPTION DEALS If the season finished today, the quarter-finals would look thus.Lions vs SharksChiefs vs HighlandersStormers vs HurricanesBrumbies vs CrusadersOnly the Waratahs and Bulls are mathematically capable of breaking into that selection of eight and even then, it would require teams above them to slip up. The Waratahs’ fate is in their own hands, within reason, as a bonus point win over the Hurricanes this week would bring them level with the Kiwi side on points. They would also be level on wins but the Australians would move above the Wellington side on the overall ladder due to a superior points difference, which is the third separator in Super Rugby after points and wins.Feel the burn: The Waratahs’ Israel Folau out paces the Sunwolves defenceThe Bulls have no such opportunity to beat a team above them in the standings and they are completely reliant on the Sharks slipping up or the Stormers having an unprecedented meltdown.Whilst the ‘Tahs will continue to scrap for top spot in the Australian conference and/or a wildcard slot, the most compelling aspect of the next two weeks could well be the race between the four Kiwi sides for top spot in the New Zealand conference and the much-coveted home quarter-final.The fixture list favours the Crusaders and if they can avoid an away quarter-final, it will take a brave man to bet against them lifting their eighth Super Rugby title and first since 2008.Whatever the permutations may be heading into the final weekend, the fact all four of these New Zealand teams meet each other should offer an enthralling spectacle. Mark it in your diaries now. With only two rounds of the Super Rugby left before the knock stages, RW assess the permutations and likely outcomeslast_img read more

Deputies vote to sell the church center headquarters in New…

first_imgDeputies vote to sell the church center headquarters in New York In-person Retreat: Thanksgiving Trinity Retreat Center (West Cornwall, CT) Nov. 24-28 Charles Smith says: Mark P. Kessinger says: AddThis Sharing ButtonsShare to PrintFriendlyPrintFriendlyShare to FacebookFacebookShare to TwitterTwitterShare to EmailEmailShare to MoreAddThis J. Harold A. Boyd says: Albert Feix III says: Prof. Harold H. Brown says: Property Featured Jobs & Calls Michael Neal says: Terry Kosnick says: [Episcopal News Service – Indianapolis] The House of Deputies today voted to direct Executive Council to sell the Episcopal Church Center at 815 Second Avenue in New York, where most of the church’s administrative staff offices are located. The action came through a resolution proposed by the Joint Legislative Committee on Structure.The resolution now goes to the House of Bishops for its consideration.Deputies on the floor removed a requirement that the sale take place before the 2015 General Convention, to give the Executive Council greater flexibility to sell at the best price possible.The Rev. Gay Jennings, the deputies’ chair of the Structure Committee, said the issue of selling the property has been studied several times in the past, and committee members decided that now was the time to do it.The Rev. Frank Hubbard, deputy from New Jersey, urged deputies to agree. He said, “815 Second Avenue is the relic of our delusions of being an established church from an imperial era. Constantine has left the building. Unfortunately, Constantine has left us the building.”Deputy Karen Phillips Smith of Southeast Florida said this was not the time to force a sale, given that the building’s tenants are paying only $35 a square foot in rent. Noting her background in international real estate development she said. “There’s no way I could sell that to anybody.” She added, “I’m not saying not sell it, I’m just saying, not now.”The resolution’s explanation noted that the building will cost more than $11 million to operate over the next three years. Debt service amounts to $8.7 million, with facilities management nearly $6.5 million. Rental income offsets those expenses by just over $4 million, for a net cost of $11,093,156.— Melodie Woerman is a member of the Episcopal News Service team at General Convention. Br. James Teets BSG says: Assistant/Associate Priest Scottsdale, AZ July 6, 2012 at 10:09 pm Why would they not consider moving the church headquarters to St. John the Divine or Washington National Cathedral? Both could surely accommodate the administrative staff and seem fitting considering their religious significance. TryTank Experimental Lab and York St. John University of England Launch Survey to Study the Impact of Covid-19 on the Episcopal Church TryTank Experimental Lab Curate Diocese of Nebraska Press Release Service Vicki Evans says: July 7, 2012 at 4:10 pm Either Cathedral would make a nice seat for the Church’s administrative staff. But as Deputy Karen Phillips Smith of Southeast Florida said above the price we could get for 815 Second Avenue in today’s market is not enough. I’m glad the requirement to sell before General Convention in 2015. Rector Albany, NY Michael Dombos says: Charles Smith says: July 7, 2012 at 6:30 pm Isn’t Province IV (Southeastern U.S.) the largest in TEC, in terms of the number of Episcopalians? Wouldn’t it make sense to move the central office to where most of the Episcopalians are? Atlanta? Charlotte? Somewhere in Florida? July 7, 2012 at 12:20 pm Jeremy – I love NYC. My daughter lives on LI. And I spend lots of time there and in the city. Realistically, as another poster pointed out, the real problems with TEC are not location but the shift from a church to a hierarchical social activist organization at the expense of mission and membership. That said, and in spite of my love for NYC, it is not representative of America. July 7, 2012 at 12:00 am Businesses have been moving to cheaper markets for a long time. Good business is knowing when you have a useless boat anchor and getting rid of it. This particular boat anchor is long overdue to be dumped. July 7, 2012 at 9:13 am Does the church have another “boat anchor” or do you plan to run adrift? Wally Wallace says: Assistant/Associate Rector Morristown, NJ An Evening with Presiding Bishop Curry and Iconographer Kelly Latimore Episcopal Migration Ministries via Zoom June 23 @ 6 p.m. ET Ruth Lindsay says: July 7, 2012 at 2:38 pm Or we could see it as “restructuring,” which any business facing difficulties must do to survive.I think it would be great for our denomination to move to the Inter Church Center on Riverside. We need more ecumenical partnerships. July 7, 2012 at 6:25 am Here’s a suggestion. Move TEC’s headquarters to Rome, NY. Think of the free publicity: “THE EPISCOPAL CHURCH GOES OVER TO ROME ! (Rome, New York, that is).”Here’s another, more serious, suggestion. Move TEC’s headquarters to our largest diocese, Haiti. What a statement that would make. Bishop Diocesan Springfield, IL Rector Hopkinsville, KY July 7, 2012 at 9:51 pm Access to culture contributes to mission how? Rector Collierville, TN Virtual Celebration of the Jerusalem Princess Basma Center Zoom Conversation June 19 @ 12 p.m. ET Rector/Priest in Charge (PT) Lisbon, ME July 7, 2012 at 3:44 pm Br. James, thank you for making any number of salient points. About the time, I was appointed in September of 1984 as Staff Officer for Stewardship, Bp. John Allin had developed a pretty good deal to sell our building at what was then a peak time in the value of Manhattan real estate and had opened up another attractive proposal to purchase that was the Braniff Airlines Center closing very near the airport in Kansas City. At least on paper, the center had every possible advantage in the center itself and the local demographics. Bp Browning and others decided against the move and that ended it. Subsequent attempts have also, as you note, fallen through. Your central point of getting the horse (mission strategy) in front of the cart (location) is, of course what should be the priority. I also agree that merely changing location now is only at best an expense issue and while important, not the “point of the spear.” Ya no son extranjeros: Un diálogo acerca de inmigración Una conversación de Zoom June 22 @ 7 p.m. ET Ed Adcock says: July 7, 2012 at 10:43 pm Jim you are absolutely correct. Move to where the majority of Episcopalians live AND where the church is at least holding its own (in terms of membership). Province IV is also where the money comes from. July 7, 2012 at 11:16 am After 9 General Conventions I have heard this discussion several times before. I have always thought that the Church Center should be on Mt. St. Albans with the National Cathedral. The Presiding Bishop’s chair is there and if we are a “church for the world” there is no more international city than D.C. since it is the home of the embassies of the world. Jim DeLa says: Director of Music Morristown, NJ Rector Shreveport, LA July 7, 2012 at 10:05 am Once again, this decision is a short-sighted solution to a longer term problem. July 6, 2012 at 8:00 pm This is the first that I have heard of this proposal, so please clarify for me to where the Episcopal Church would move its Administrative Headquarters, if the property at 815 Second Avenue is sold. Or would they simply remain there as tenants in a building they formerly owned? July 8, 2012 at 7:39 am Hi Ron! It’s good to hear from you again; perhaps you recall when we served at 815 together? I joined the staff as Administrator of the World Mission Unit in July of 1986. Though I began there shortly after PB Edmund Browning came, I do remember PB John Allin’s plan to sell the building — it was a fairly new building at that time, being just about 25 years old — but the tide of interest in centralization throughout TEC swung against him and the deal was passed up. Those were the good days, when the GC Program Budget increased each year and new staff were regularly hired to fill all the opportunities for mission that that new money made possible. Several other attempts to sell 815 have come forward over time; I recall a time when Executive Council was ready to accept an offer for about $75 million, and then the most recent one during PB Frank Griswold’s time which ran right up to the last minute before he changed his mind about moving to GTS. But it is both laughable and sad to see all of the negativity and anti-Church Center verbiage flying around this issue! It seems like there are those among us who want to see our church fail and become less and less relevant; when I came on staff the name of a number of offices included “…in Church and Society,” which told the story of involvement in life around us. This is not the first time we have seen such negativity, but it is nonetheless painful to read. It is obvious that moving a centralized staff to an obscure area of the country would have enormous impact upon the church’s ability to attract and retain the most talented and dedicated people to serve in its offices and departments, and in that case, what would you have?It’s nice to see your name again, Ron, and I wish you all the best. Charles Smith says: Associate Rector for Family Ministries Anchorage, AK Lynn A. Collins says: Peter Tucker says: Rector Martinsville, VA General Convention, Youth Minister Lorton, VA July 6, 2012 at 11:57 pm Why not start walking the walk instead of just talk and put the church on a Native American reservation, whatever location has the highest poverty and unemployment. As for air travel, by far and large get over it. Email and video conference – take the same steps corporations are using to cut travel costs. I would love to see the church center located somewhere where the only airlines available were prop commuters, where there would be significant disincentive to travel when any other means of conducting business were possible. Comments (59) July 7, 2012 at 8:54 am SF is good although ‘innovative’ is not a word I would use to describe the city. Flaky is more what comes to mind. Still, a good fit for the COWHN. July 7, 2012 at 9:13 am NY offered an opportunity to be in the midst of the advocacy, and change, but we have lost our advocacy edge, and spiritual compass- so let’s go quietly into the night. July 7, 2012 at 3:43 am Well said, Charles. Peter Tucker says: Peter Tucker says: An Evening with Aliya Cycon Playing the Oud Lancaster, PA (and streaming online) July 3 @ 7 p.m. ET July 6, 2012 at 8:56 pm Hopefully not! This is a unique opportunity to end the Babylonian captivity of the church. The GC should seriously consider relocating the PB and staff a mid-sized city such as Dayton, Kansas City or such. Church hierarchy needs to reconnect with grass roots Americans! And, reduce expenses.P.S. What’s wrong with Portland? Comments navigation Newer comments Submit an Event Listing Rector Tampa, FL Charles Smith says: July 7, 2012 at 9:35 pm Run the numbers. A good case could be made that the church is already adrift as the aging membership dies off and are not replaced. The sort of anchors needed are backsides in the pews, not a NYC building. July 7, 2012 at 12:04 pm I rather like the idea of the Lakota reservation in South Dakota. There, you have a native American community that already has an Episcopal presence, an area with a lot of poverty and unemployment – in short, a place where ECUSA could put some of their high sounding words to actual practice.Personally, I’d like to see it in Barrow, Alaska. That, I think, would tend to curb unnecessary travel, encourage use of electronic communication and meetings, and allow the hot air from the church center to be put to good use. House of Deputies, Submit a Job Listing Mark P. Kessinger says: July 8, 2012 at 6:44 pm In what way, specifically, is NYC “not representative of America?” Is it not white enough? Not suburban enough? Too multicultural? Do tell. Jeremy Bates says: Missioner for Disaster Resilience Sacramento, CA Comments navigation Newer comments July 7, 2012 at 7:07 pm I favor at or near National Cathedral in Washington, and ask how would it improve our image as an elitist, not really serious, denomination to establish our headquarters in Palm Springs, CA, Hollywood’s playground?I’m for Nat. Cathedral with business offices in suburban VA. Wally Wallace says: Charles Smith says: Rector Bath, NC July 7, 2012 at 5:00 am First of all–great article, Melodie.Secondly, I’ve always liked the KC,MO site option best. For, let’s see, going on 20 years now since I first heard the issue discussed. Rector (FT or PT) Indian River, MI Jason Moskal says: Peter Tucker says: Nellwyn Beamon says: July 9, 2012 at 10:24 am It adds to the quality of life to those who would work at the center. Polk Van Zandt says: Rector Pittsburgh, PA July 7, 2012 at 9:47 am Peter Tucker, what exactly about NYC says “not bedrock America” to you?The city’s politics? Its racial diversity?What exactly is it about Americans who live in New York makes them, in your mind, not “real Americans”? Rector Knoxville, TN July 9, 2012 at 9:38 am Have you experienced the traffic situation in Northern VA lately, David? Not to mention real estate costs …TEC doesn’t need a physical “center.” Let Jesus be the center of our collective efforts to spread the Gospel. As others have said, we can communicate using technology. On the occasions when we need face-to-face meeting time, we can pick a location and book meeting space. Stuart Brier says: July 7, 2012 at 9:41 pm A good case may be made that one of the reasons that membership, contributions and the lack are in free fall is ECUSA is no longer a church, but a liberal PAC. Submit a Press Release Comments are closed. Featured Events By Melodie WoermanPosted Jul 6, 2012 Tags July 7, 2012 at 7:25 am I have imagined this taking place for most of the 35 years I have been in ordained ministry. It’s nothing negative about New York, a great city. It’s just too expensive, too far from the geographical center of the American Church and, yes, way too far from the center of a servant church. Congratulations to the House of Deputies, and I hope the HOB approves as well. A moving center is a wonderful vision.Jon Coffey, St. Mark’s, Jacksonville, Florida July 7, 2012 at 7:43 am I think the church HQ should be in California, say, San Francisco. It would be an environment much more in tune with the church’s innovative philosophies. Episcopal Migration Ministries’ Virtual Prayer Vigil for World Refugee Day Facebook Live Prayer Vigil June 20 @ 7 p.m. ET General Convention 2012, Inaugural Diocesan Feast Day Celebrating Juneteenth San Francisco, CA (and livestream) June 19 @ 2 p.m. PT Join the Episcopal Diocese of Texas in Celebrating the Pauli Murray Feast Online Worship Service June 27 July 7, 2012 at 4:28 am Palm Springs, California welcomes the Episcopal Church. Very reasonable cost of living, beautiful climate, and a population that is warm, accepting, and outgoing. Go west! Virtual Episcopal Latino Ministry Competency Course Online Course Aug. 9-13 July 7, 2012 at 8:56 pm While it’s understandable in today’s economy that TEC would need to cut expenses, selling Church Center and relocating might incur some extra expense in terms of staffing. If some staff members who have excellent skills and needed knowledge for the work are not able to relocate and have to leave, wouldn’t it be costly in some ways to train brand new people for these posts? David Justin Lynch, Esquire says: Betty Cordoza says: Episcopal Church releases new prayer book translations into Spanish and French, solicits feedback Episcopal Church Office of Public Affairs The Church Investment Group Commends the Taskforce on the Theology of Money on its report, The Theology of Money and Investing as Doing Theology Church Investment Group Monty Pitts says: New Berrigan Book With Episcopal Roots Cascade Books Remember Holy Land Christians on Jerusalem Sunday, June 20 American Friends of the Episcopal Diocese of Jerusalem Rev Lisa B Hamilton says: This Summer’s Anti-Racism Training Online Course (Diocese of New Jersey) June 18-July 16 The Church Pension Fund Invests $20 Million in Impact Investment Fund Designed to Preserve Workforce Housing Communities Nationwide Church Pension Group Canon for Family Ministry Jackson, MS July 7, 2012 at 1:54 pm Restructuring TEC should determine housing needs. In the meantime, good move to get 815 on the market! DAVID E OWEN says: July 7, 2012 at 10:11 pm Thank you, Jeremy, for calling out this needless perpetuation of the myth that New Yorkers are somehow less authentically American than folks in other parts of the country. That kind of divisiveness should have no place in our church! July 6, 2012 at 10:31 pm As a business owner this looks like the death of a denomination……….slowly selling off assets……. Family Ministry Coordinator Baton Rouge, LA Associate Rector Columbus, GA Priest-in-Charge Lebanon, OH Laurie Brown says: July 6, 2012 at 11:32 pm I have found that air travel to a secondary or tertiary city is always 50-100% more expensive than to/from NYC. This usually, for short meeting trips, negates any perceived savings — actually, it usually means that the meeting will cost 50% more.Also, greater NYC is a place that many, many people want to call home. 22 Million people as a matter of fact. Contained within the dioceses of NY, CT, NJ, NWK, and LI are almost 1000 Episcopal churches. Would we draw from as talented and diverse an Episcopalian population if we, say, moved to Portland, and either recruited people to live there or relied on those who commute to Portland? Assistant/Associate Rector Washington, DC The Revd Sarah V. Lewis says: Ian Montgomery says: July 7, 2012 at 7:42 am St. John the Divine makes sense. National Cathedral, no way. That area is even more disconnected from America than NYC. The opportunity here is to get them in the midst of real Americans and away from the elitist liberals in the Northeast. We need a centrist perspective and that will not happen in NYC. Minneapolis-St. Paul is another good option. Bedrock America. July 7, 2012 at 5:31 pm The question(s) are “what money” and “how much is there”? More importantly, what is the National HQ, what should it look like and how best can it serve the Church? 815 is an asset at a “low” market value. The National HQ, ERD and other agencies take up more than half the building. Relocation of the HQ will results in the purchase or lease of square footage to house these organizations. What is the Church willing to spend on a HQ? Associate Priest for Pastoral Care New York, NY Rector and Chaplain Eugene, OR Peter Tucker says: Seminary of the Southwest announces appointment of two new full time faculty members Seminary of the Southwest Curate (Associate & Priest-in-Charge) Traverse City, MI Cathedral Dean Boise, ID (The Rev.) Ronald L. Reed says: Course Director Jerusalem, Israel July 6, 2012 at 7:48 pm This is long overdue. I believe that the new church office should be in the Northwest, Perhaps Oregon. Rector Belleville, IL Rector Washington, DC Episcopal Charities of the Diocese of New York Hires Reverend Kevin W. VanHook, II as Executive Director Episcopal Charities of the Diocese of New York July 7, 2012 at 5:01 pm I agree wholeheartedly with the gentleman who suggested the national headquarters should move to Palm Springs, CA. We have the best weather in the world, low housing costs, reasonable distance to Los Angeles and San Diego for culture, and it does have an airport and a train station. The money tied up in 815 can and should be used for mission. Director of Administration & Finance Atlanta, GA Rector Smithfield, NC Charles Smith says: Jon Coffey says: July 7, 2012 at 12:02 pm Melodie Woerman’s press release (above) is missing the crucial piece of such a decision to sell the Church Center: how would TEC administratively reorganize itself? That is the “horse” that should be before the “cart” in my opinion! Other responders seem to assume that the PB and the TEC staff would move together to some other location around the country, but that is not said in the release. Since a number of the departmental offices headquartered at 815 now actually function from remote locations, both inside and outside the USA, it seems natural to at least consider a full breakup of all the departmental structures now housed there; the PB could work out of her home in Nevada; the Treasurer’s and the Controller’s Offices could rent an office suite in some low-rent building somewhere else in the country, as could the Office of the General Convention; and the programmatic offices could each be relocated to the homes of each of the staff officers wherever they live. In that way, there would be no ‘central office or headquarters of TEC’ anywhere in the country and all of those who have for many years pushed to remove the Church Center from NYC — for whatever reasons — would then have nothing further to complain about, at least on that topic.As to the space and housing issues that some have raised, I have no idea where anyone would think there is sufficient office space available on the grounds of the Cathedral Church of Saint John the Divine in NYC as it now exists. The NY diocesan and the cathedral staffs are cramped into the existing buildings on the Cathedral Close today, and if a new building were to be built to house the TEC staff, that would assumedly use up at least as much money as the sale of the building at 815 Second Avenue could generate. And that assumes that the Dean and Chapter of the Cathedral Church of Saint John the Divine — who is the landlord at 1027 Amsterdam Avenue — would be willing to allow the TEC staff to move there and could find sufficient land on which to build a new Church Center. I do agree that the chance to move to the GTS campus was a very great missed opportunity, but that was then and this is now.And anyone familiar with the GCs of the past realize that this effort is just the latest of a whole string of similarly-voiced desires to “move the Church Center out of NYC to the heart of the country” — all of which have failed. Indeed, while NYC is not geographically the center of the nation, when you begin to add up all the Episcopalians living in CT, New York State and New Jersey, that sure looks like “the heart of The Episcopal Church” to me! Why anyone would think that moving our denominational headquarters to a small town somewhere in mid-America would be an improvement, either to the Mission of the Church or to its visibility and functionality, has always been beyond me! July 6, 2012 at 11:06 pm While I do not advocate selling 815 (the church just paid to upgrade the facility), while living in NYC, 815 never had a real presence to evangelize. In terms of our “headquarters” and the many famous and historic churches in NYC, the national church never materialized the opportunity to showcase our church and show what we are all about. In addition, 815 should have been a well-versed resource/evangelism center. I say the admin should have moved to GTS when it was proposed a few years back, and would have sustained GTS footprint but as well secured GTS and the EC with some endowment. I propose doing something creative instead of a quick sale for quick cash…..lets be visionary and come up with a creative way to unburden the full cost of the building and make 815 a shared resource evangelism center(with our communion partners: ELCA & possible Moravian church) to serve the northeast (with expectation of satellite resource centers in other cities throughout the country). Priest Associate or Director of Adult Ministries Greenville, SC Br. James Teets BSG says: last_img read more

Video: Refugee, Migration and the Anglican Communion

first_img Course Director Jerusalem, Israel Submit a Job Listing The Church Pension Fund Invests $20 Million in Impact Investment Fund Designed to Preserve Workforce Housing Communities Nationwide Church Pension Group Bishop Diocesan Springfield, IL Priest Associate or Director of Adult Ministries Greenville, SC Rector Shreveport, LA Priest-in-Charge Lebanon, OH Cathedral Dean Boise, ID Missioner for Disaster Resilience Sacramento, CA Assistant/Associate Priest Scottsdale, AZ Assistant/Associate Rector Morristown, NJ Remember Holy Land Christians on Jerusalem Sunday, June 20 American Friends of the Episcopal Diocese of Jerusalem Assistant/Associate Rector Washington, DC Submit an Event Listing New Berrigan Book With Episcopal Roots Cascade Books By Matthew DaviesPosted Jun 20, 2016 Tags Youth Minister Lorton, VA Comments (1) Virtual Celebration of the Jerusalem Princess Basma Center Zoom Conversation June 19 @ 12 p.m. ET An Evening with Presiding Bishop Curry and Iconographer Kelly Latimore Episcopal Migration Ministries via Zoom June 23 @ 6 p.m. ET In-person Retreat: Thanksgiving Trinity Retreat Center (West Cornwall, CT) Nov. 24-28 Canon for Family Ministry Jackson, MS June 21, 2016 at 1:22 pm Thank you, Matthew Davies, for this fine video. I plan to donate to the Canadian Anglican relief and development organization (PWRDF) and also to renew my membership in our localenvironmental society (SES) . The Church Investment Group Commends the Taskforce on the Theology of Money on its report, The Theology of Money and Investing as Doing Theology Church Investment Group Join the Episcopal Diocese of Texas in Celebrating the Pauli Murray Feast Online Worship Service June 27 Featured Events Ya no son extranjeros: Un diálogo acerca de inmigración Una conversación de Zoom June 22 @ 7 p.m. ET Kathleen Storrie says: Seminary of the Southwest announces appointment of two new full time faculty members Seminary of the Southwest Curate Diocese of Nebraska Family Ministry Coordinator Baton Rouge, LA AddThis Sharing ButtonsShare to PrintFriendlyPrintFriendlyShare to FacebookFacebookShare to TwitterTwitterShare to EmailEmailShare to MoreAddThis Rector Martinsville, VA Rector Washington, DC TryTank Experimental Lab and York St. John University of England Launch Survey to Study the Impact of Covid-19 on the Episcopal Church TryTank Experimental Lab Video: Refugee, Migration and the Anglican Communion Curate (Associate & Priest-in-Charge) Traverse City, MI Rector and Chaplain Eugene, OR This Summer’s Anti-Racism Training Online Course (Diocese of New Jersey) June 18-July 16 Associate Priest for Pastoral Care New York, NY Video Rector (FT or PT) Indian River, MI Rector Belleville, IL Rector Albany, NY Rector Collierville, TN Associate Rector for Family Ministries Anchorage, AK Press Release Service [Episcopal News Service] With World Refugee Day being observed today (June 20), ENS is republishing a video produced in collaboration with the Anglican Communion Office, titled “Refugee, Migration and the Anglican Communion.” The video explores the global impact of the refugee crisis and the responses from Anglicans worldwide. Inaugural Diocesan Feast Day Celebrating Juneteenth San Francisco, CA (and livestream) June 19 @ 2 p.m. PT Episcopal Migration Ministries’ Virtual Prayer Vigil for World Refugee Day Facebook Live Prayer Vigil June 20 @ 7 p.m. ET Rector Bath, NC Associate Rector Columbus, GA Submit a Press Release Director of Music Morristown, NJ Featured Jobs & Calls Director of Administration & Finance Atlanta, GA Rector Pittsburgh, PA Rector Tampa, FL Refugees Migration & Resettlement, Episcopal Charities of the Diocese of New York Hires Reverend Kevin W. VanHook, II as Executive Director Episcopal Charities of the Diocese of New York Rector/Priest in Charge (PT) Lisbon, ME Rector Knoxville, TN Rector Hopkinsville, KY Anglican Communion, Rector Smithfield, NC Comments are closed.last_img read more

Chad: Resistance to the coup, opposition to France

first_imgStudents protest in Chad.May 2 — U.S. and French imperialism have competing interests in how an ongoing crisis in Chad is resolved. They also share common interests in keeping imperialism dominant. The crisis flows from the death of Chad’s president Idriss Déby in combat April 20 against the armed opposition front FACT. Right now it appears that French imperialism has the advantage, while the U.S. government is taking steps to ensure its interests are protected.FACT, the Front pour l’Alternance et la Concorde au Tchad, is an armed group, based in southern Libya, whose main political demand is eliminating Déby’s regime. It appears to be well supplied with heavy weapons. From where is unclear.The headquarters of Operation Barkhane, France’s military intervention in the Sahel — the band of countries stretching across Africa on the edge of the Sahara desert — is in N’Djamena, the capital of Chad. AFRICOM, the U.S. Command for Africa, also has a base in N’Djamena.Chad’s main value to French and U.S. imperialism appears to be strategic. It is in the center of Africa and has borders with Nigeria, around Lake Chad, Niger, Libya, the Sudan, the Central Africa Republic and Cameroon. It has a well-trained, well-equipped and well-led army that has been very useful in operations against Boko Haram in northern Nigeria and resisting Islamic groups in the triangle formed by Mali, Burkina Faso and Niger.Mahamat Idriss Déby, one of Idriss Déby’s sons, an army general, quickly set up a military council, dissolved the government and parliament, and promised transparent, free and fair elections in 18 months. While Idriss Déby’s election to another term as president was due to be announced the day he was killed, this action of Mahamat Déby was still an illegal coup.Protests were organized in N’Djamena and also Moundou, the second largest city in Chad in the south, where farming is the main occupation.The protests were quickly broken up by cops using tear gas and live rounds. According to Baldal Oyamta, the Chadian coordinator for human rights, at least nine people were killed and 50 people were seriously injured. Scores were arrested. (tinyurl.com/ykmpyd4d)Gounoung Vaïma is general secretary of the Union of Chadian Trade Unions (UST). He gave an interview to Tchadinfo, an Internet site covering news and events in Chad, on the eve of May Day. Vaïma said “At the current time, we are asking workers to not go in, because we don’t know what could happen. We don’t want to expose folks.” He went on to say “The aim of the UST is radical change.” (tinyurl.com/yvjxk2eb)FacebookTwitterWhatsAppEmailPrintMoreShare thisFacebookTwitterWhatsAppEmailPrintMoreShare thislast_img read more

Wave of attacks on reporters covering coronavirus lockdown in Ukraine

first_img Help by sharing this information RSF_en March 26, 2021 Find out more Crimean journalist “confesses” to spying for Ukraine on Russian TV Organisation to go further February 26, 2021 Find out more Ukraine escalates “information war” by banning three pro-Kremlin media News News Receive email alerts UkraineEurope – Central Asia Condemning abusesProtecting journalists ImpunityViolence News After a wave of physical attacks or other acts of intimidation or obstruction of journalists covering the coronavirus lockdown in Ukraine, Reporters Without Borders (RSF) calls on the authorities to guarantee the safety of media personnel and to ensure that they are able to report on the coronavirus epidemic.The latest targets include Alla Zhiznevska, a young ZIK TV reporter, and her crew, who were covering the lockdown in Kiev on 2 April when they were attacked by several men upset by the restrictions imposed during the quarantine. One of the assailants, who physically attacked Zhiznevska, was placed under house arrest on 7 April, but this has been the only arrest in the ten or so incidents targeting journalists since the lockdown was declared in Ukraine.”The coronavirus crisis is being accompanied by an additional danger for Ukraine’s journalists, who have become a favourite target for the discontent of some members of the public,” said Jeanne Cavelier, the head of RSF’s Eastern Europe and Central Asia desk.”At the same time, it is disturbing to see local authorities using the lockdown to limit or control the media’s access to information that is of general interest. Access to information and journalists’ safety must be guaranteed, now more than ever. We deplore the lack of any reaction from President Zelensky and his government.”All of the attacks against journalists have taken place in public and have been carried out by persons who clearly disagreed with the lockdown and mistrusted the media, which have received little support or protection from the authorities.The latest victims also include Espresso TV reporter Dina Zelenskaya and her crew, who were doing a story on compliance with the lockdown by restaurants in Kiev on 2 April when they were attacked by a man who threw the crew’s camera and Zelenskaya’s phone into the River Dnieper.In the western city of Chernivtsi, Galina Eremitsa, a reporter for the local news website Chernivtsi.Online, was attacked on 30 March by two Russian Orthodox worshippers who tried to break her camera. In the northwestern city of Lviv, a Pershiy Zakhiniy TV crew were filming in a store on 27 March when they were locked inside by the store’s owner. In the nearby Krasiliv region, a NewsOne TV reporter’s arm was broken by a face mask vendor on 25 March.There have also been cases of harassment and obstruction not involving violence. Security guards prevented RFE/RL journalists from filming outside the Kiev Monastery of the Caves on 19 March. When Hromadske TV reporter Alina Sheremeta was filming at a store near the capital on 24 March, she was insulted and followed by a man.Local authorities have used the lockdown as a pretext for denying some journalists access to meetings that are supposed to be public. This is the case in the east-central city of Kryvyi Rih, where the authorities have prevented independent media outlets from attending municipal council meetings “because of the quarantine” although the city’s own media were allowed to attend.In the southern city of Nova Kakhovka, journalists were made to leave a council meeting on public health grounds when the council voted on its budget. In the nearby town Kakhovka, only two media outlets were allowed to attend a council meeting, while no media were allowed to attend a council meeting in the nearby village of Lyubimivka.Ukraine is ranked 102nd out of 180 countries in RSF’s 2019 World Press Freedom Index. Crédit : Sergei SUPINSKY / AFP News Follow the news on Ukraine UkraineEurope – Central Asia Condemning abusesProtecting journalists ImpunityViolence April 10, 2020 Wave of attacks on reporters covering coronavirus lockdown in Ukraine Ukrainian media group harassed by broadcasting authority September 7, 2020 Find out morelast_img read more

Hays wins Ector County judge

first_img Church leaders condemn mayor’s disparaging comments Chris Fostel, left; Debi Hays Landgraf staffer resigns following investigation Twitter Debi Hays receives a hug from her mother Alta Grozier, 82, after she is announced as the winner of the Ector County Judge race Tuesday night at an election party. WhatsApp Pinterest Debi Hays receives encouraging words from her husband Dwayne Hays after she is announced as the winner of the Ector County Judge race Tuesday night at an election party. Businesswoman Debi Hays will become the next Ector County judge, after winning more than 60 percent of the vote in the Republican primary race against former prosecutor Chris Fostel.It was the first time in 16 years that the county’s top administrator had been decided by a contested election, with 7,805 votes cast in the race. And it fell as the county faces critical challenges including the prospect of an ongoing budget crisis and finding a way to replace a courthouse in disrepair.“I have never done anything by myself — it takes everyone together to win,” Hays said in a brief speech at an election party hosted by County Attorney Dusty Gallivan. “No matter what goal we’ve set, it takes all of us to be able to do that.”Hays will be the first county judge in decades who is not an attorney, a fact she and her supporters touted during the campaign. Pinterest Facebook WhatsApp Debi Hays gives a victory speech after she is announced as the winner of the Ector County Judge race Tuesday night at an election party. Previous articleSimmons holds on to seatNext articleGIRLS SOCCER: Permian limits mistakes, but can’t keep Midland High off the scoreboard admin RELATED ARTICLESMORE FROM AUTHOR Chris Fostel, left; Debi Hays Home Local News Government Hays wins Ector County judge By admin – March 6, 2018 Facebook Landgraf prepares for state budget debate “I think that voters are really going to look to make sure that I’ve kept my word of making sure that their vote counts, and that there is transparency, that I have an open-door policy, and that the county is a good steward of their money,” Hays said.The race was decided Tuesday because no challenger had filed for the November election. Incumbent County Judge Ron Eckert’s term expires at the end of this year. But Eckert, who announced he would not seek re-election after voters shot down a proposal last year to create a sales tax for unincorporated parts of Ector County, has left open the possibility of resigning before the end of his term.That leaves the length of Hays’ transition unclear.“If he steps down and the commissioners want me to step in, I will do that,” Hays said.She said she planned to meet with county departments as she prepared for the role.Ector County voters will again decide on the county sales tax proposal during an election in May, and Hays said she would campaign for its passage free of the restrictions that prevent current office holders from doing so.Hays, like Fostel, had never been elected to office or served in a top governmental role before entering the race for county judge.A majority of the county judge’s duties are chiefly administrative: proposing a budget, presiding over the commissioners court, working with departments and serving on boards with important functions like transportation planning.Hays touted her more than three decade history in Odessa beginning as a clerk without a college degree and rising to an executive position at a savings and loan company, a business consultant, and an entrepreneur who ran a successful tanning salon and later, La Mirage Spa and Beauty Salon, which remains in business.She had also served in leadership roles of influential conservative groups including the Ector County Republican Women and the Ector County Republican Party.But Hays’ victory also meant a break with the tradition of electing attorneys to the post.Fostel had repeatedly argued that failing to elect an attorney would create a backlog at the two County Courts at Law because the county judge could no longer help with the criminal misdemeanor case load. But Hays and supporters including Gallivan disputed that her election would strain the courts.“Ector County is going to be very fortunate to have Ms. Hays as our new county judge,” Gallivan said, adding that the biggest issues facing the next county judge are financial. “She will bring a new perspective to the office that we haven’t had.” Kris Crow, left, Ector County Sheriff Mike Griffis, center left, Debi Hays, center, and Bill Page read early voting results Tuesday night at an election party. Local NewsGovernment Hays wins Ector County judge 1 of 5 Twitter Southern Style Potato SaladUpside Down Blueberry Pie CheesecakeSlap Your Mama It’s So Delicious Southern Squash CasserolePowered By 10 Sec Mama’s Deviled Eggs NextStay last_img read more

Teacher, coach retires from ECISD

first_img Twitter Facebook Facebook WhatsApp Twitter Home Local News Education Teacher, coach retires from ECISD She went to Abilene High School and played tennis there and then to Hardin-Simmons University to play tennis. She earned a bachelor’s degree in kinesiology and speech.As soon as she got her degree, Sudbury said, she wanted to go move back to Odessa and has spent 36 years with the district. She started off as a PE aide in an elementary school and the next year got a job starting a tennis program at the junior high schools.“I was at Bonham, where I’d left before. I was in the teachers’ lounge for the first time. It felt so cool to be in the teachers’ lounge and I had … a Pop Tart, stuck it in the microwave and it blew up. I did not know I was supposed to take the Pop Tart out … first day on the job,” Sudbury said.Through the years, Sudbury said she had some amazing students in the tennis program.“Now I have tennis kids that are married to each other and they have kids now. I’m still such good friends with Coach (Pat) Wikse, who the tennis courts are named after (at Permian),” Sudbury said.Although she loved coaching, Sudbury said the long weekends and nights were hard on her. In 1995, she had surgery for scoliosis at the end of May and was back on the tennis courts by July, but the students helped her through that.When she was ready to stop coaching, Sudbury said Assistant Superintendent of Secondary Operations Roy Garcia, who was then principal of PHS, asked her to attend a summer conference on AVID, which stands for Advancement Via Individual Determination, a college preparation program for at-risk students.Sudbury said she attended the conference and fell in the love with the program because “it’s all about helping kids.”Garcia asked her how she liked the conference and then if she wanted be the coordinator at Permian.This past year, she went to the AVID program at Odessa High School, which is a national demonstration site for the program. Greg Nelson, who was principal at OHS before moving to head up OCTECHS, asked her to come over because the campus was up for revalidation by the national AVID program.“The faculty over there is just so close and were so sweet to me and just helpful. The whole thing about it it’s about the kids. You’ve got the same kind of kids in AVID. They’re just a separate group of AVID kids, which is another family,” Sudbury said.Dianne Mata, district director for AVID, said Sudbury was a natural fit for the program.“She transformed Permian AVID in many great ways. Her classroom was a welcoming and safe place for students. She grew AVID, not just in numbers but in inspiring so many students. Although she transferred to OHS AVID for her last year, she still maintained her AVIDly awesome spirit with her students,” Mata said in an email.“She was instrumental in supporting OHS as they underwent their rigorous process of being revalidated as an AVID National Demonstration site for three more years. She has a great spirit and a big heart for her students. We will certainly miss her, but she will always remain a big part of our AVID family,” she added.This year, Sudbury’s mother died. Her father is a seven-year pancreatic cancer survivor. Her parents were married for 66 years and he took care of her until her last breath.Sudbury decided to spend more time with her family. She also has two daughters, Kristi Mann and Melissa Acosta, and one grandson.When she had to tell her students at OHS she was retiring, before she told them what was going on a student guessed that she was pregnant.Sudbury explained why she was leaving and the girl said, “I wish you were pregnant.”She added that the friends she’s made through ECISD have helped her through the hills and valleys in her life.“Those valley parts, I couldn’t have done it without some of my parents. They’re like family to me and the kids are,” she said.Being part of the school family and having an influence on students is what she’s enjoyed most about her coaching and teaching career. Wherever she goes, she encourages youngsters to attend college and enroll in AVID.“They were also an influence on me. We go through life together and we support each other together, but I have met some of the most amazing principals, coaches, kids and parents. Odessa used to be a small town and now it’s a big town, but it’s kind of like our family has grown. It’s really neat,” Sudbury said.More Information OCA top 2 were ESL students Mary Kay Sudbury has had many lives with Ector County Independent School District.A physical education aide, tennis coach and AVID coordinator, Sudbury has had an impact on students from the courts to the classroom.Petite, energetic and relentlessly chipper, Sudbury has always wanted to teach and grade papers. When she was in ninth grade, Sudbury made cheerleader at Bonham Middle School. She came home and told her mother. Her mother told her that was good, but they were moving to Abilene.“It broke my heart,” Sudbury said. Previous articleTEXAS VIEW: Abbott’s school safety plan depends on actionNext articleGabe McDonald trial begins Monday admin RELATED ARTICLESMORE FROM AUTHOR 1 of 2 Mary Kay Sudbury holds Odessa and Permian High School medallions. Local NewsEducation Teacher, coach retires from ECISD ECISD AVID program. Registration set for engineering camp Mary Kay Sudbury holds Odessa and Permian High School medallions. Summer Spaghetti SaladHawaiian Roll Ham SlidersSmoked Bacon Wrapped French Vidalia OnionPowered By 10 Sec Mama’s Deviled Eggs NextStay Pinterest WhatsApp Pinterest Mary Kay Sudbury is retiring. She’s been an AVID (advancement via individual determination) teacher for many years at OHS and Permian. Noel earns award By admin – June 9, 2018 last_img read more

BREAKING : President Appoints Justice NV Ramana As Next Chief Justice Of India

first_imgTop StoriesBREAKING : President Appoints Justice NV Ramana As Next Chief Justice Of India LIVELAW NEWS NETWORK5 April 2021 10:06 PMShare This – xThe President of India Ram Nath Kovind has appointed Justice NV Ramana as the 48th Chief Justice of India, accepting the recommendation made by the outgoing CJI SA Bobde, who is retiring on April 23.As the CJI, Justice Ramana will have a term till August 26, 2022.Before his elevation to the Supreme Court on February 17, 2014, Justice Ramana was the Chief Justice of the Delhi High Court.He…Your free access to Live Law has expiredTo read the article, get a premium account.Your Subscription Supports Independent JournalismSubscription starts from ₹ 599+GST (For 6 Months)View PlansPremium account gives you:Unlimited access to Live Law Archives, Weekly/Monthly Digest, Exclusive Notifications, Comments.Reading experience of Ad Free Version, Petition Copies, Judgement/Order Copies.Subscribe NowAlready a subscriber?LoginThe President of India Ram Nath Kovind has appointed Justice NV Ramana as the 48th Chief Justice of India, accepting the recommendation made by the outgoing CJI SA Bobde, who is retiring on April 23.As the CJI, Justice Ramana will have a term till August 26, 2022.Before his elevation to the Supreme Court on February 17, 2014, Justice Ramana was the Chief Justice of the Delhi High Court.He was born in an agricultural family on August 27, 1957 in Ponnavaram Village, Krishna District, Andhra Pradesh. He enrolled as an Advocate on February 10, 1983 and practiced in the High Court of Andhra Pradesh, Central and Andhra Pradesh Administrative Tribunals and the Supreme Court of India in Civil, Criminal, Constitutional, Labour, Service and Election matters.He has also functioned as Additional Advocate General of Andhra Pradesh. He was appointed as a permanent Judge of the Andhra Pradesh High Court on June 27, 2000. He functioned as Acting Chief Justice of Andhra Pradesh High Court from March 10, 2013 to May 20, 2013. Two weeks back, the Supreme Court had dismissed a complaint made by Andhra Pradesh Chief Minister Jagan Mohan Reddy alleging that Justice Ramana was interfering with the State Judiciary in politically sensitive cases. After a confidential in-house enquiry, the Supreme Court dismissed the Andhra CM’s complaint as meritless. The Notification appointing Justice NV Ramana as the 48th Chief Justice of India.#SupremeCourt #JusticeNVRamana https://t.co/FaECplxHOx pic.twitter.com/5PKldg1zlO— Live Law (@LiveLawIndia) April 6, 2021 Click here to read/download the notificationNext Storylast_img read more