Mens Basketball Ohio States future secured with NCAA Tournament bid

Head coach Chris Holtmann talks to the Buckeyes during a timeout in the second half of the game against Michigan State at the Big Ten tournament on Mar. 14 in Chicago. Ohio State lost 77-70. Credit: Casey Cascaldo | Photo EditorAfter Ohio State’s loss to Michigan State in the Big Ten tournament semifinal, head coach Chris Holtmann was confident that his team’s body of work was representative of an NCAA Tournament team. He felt the same the day after, telling Ohio State athletic director Gene Smith he felt the Buckeyes were locked in as an 11 seed, maybe even a 10. Then Sunday rolled around. “As each hour passed today and I studied the numbers, I studied myself into absolute paranoia,” Holtmann said. “I just had to stop. Thank God we had practice.” For the first time in his coaching career, Holtmann experienced what leading a bubble team was really like. And on Sunday, sequestered in a room together as a team, experiencing the pressure of the unknown as a group, the unknown became known. Ohio State was an NCAA Tournament team. “All season long, we have been leaning on each other just throughout the struggles,” senior guard C.J. Jackson said. “Obviously this year has had its ups and downs and just to see our name pop up there is a bit of a sigh of relief.” For redshirt senior guard Keyshawn Woods, Ohio State’s name popping up as an 11 seed set to play Iowa State in Tulsa, Oklahoma was validation that he made the right decision to join Holtmann for his final season. This was what came to mind for the second-year head coach when Ohio State’s future became secure, watching Woods achieve what he has wanted for his collegiate career. “Keyshawn, the reason he came here was to play in the NCAA Tournament,” Holtmann said. “It wasn’t me. He basically came here and said, ‘Hey, I’m putting my faith in you that I can get there.’” Woods echoed that sentiment, saying the NCAA Tournament was always on his mind when selecting a school to spend his last season. “It’s the whole reason why I chose to become a Buckeye,” Woods said. “The belief I had in the guys, C.J., coach Holtmann, the staff, it’s a great feeling, especially to see our name pop up there.” But Holtmann said, at the beginning of the season, what Woods strived for was no guarantee. He said the Buckeyes had to establish a new identity from the very start of the season. Even with that, playing well, finding the right players to mold into his scheme and game plan, Holtmann said a Tournament bid was not exactly expected. “I thought we would have to play well. I did,” Holtmann said. “I thought it was if we played well, I thought it would be very close.” Now that Ohio State has made the NCAA Tournament for the second year in a row — Holtmann’s fifth-straight season dating back to his head coaching tenure at Butler — the approach is not one of appreciating the bid. Simply put, the Buckeyes want to show up. “I don’t think that was just our goal: just to make the Tournament. We are not here just to play one game in the Tournament,” Jackson said. “We are here to actually win some games and make a run. Not winning anymore games up to this point is not our approach and not what we are thinking.” Ohio State will begin that run against Iowa State, a team that had just won the Big 12 Championship Saturday against Kansas and had defeated six ranked opponents this season. Holtmann thought the Cyclones might be the No. 1 team of all the six seeds, saying they could have easily been a five seed. No matter Ohio State’s performance against the Cyclones in the first round of the NCAA Tournament, Jackson will end his season in the big dance, in March Madness: where he wanted it to end. And as for the future, Jackson said that is not unknown. “I just think that that shows that Ohio State is back and it doesn’t look like it’s slowing down anytime soon.” read more

Policy Holders of liquidated BAFSL collecting 25cents on the dollar for some

first_imgFacebook Twitter Google+LinkedInPinterestWhatsAppProvidenciales, 08 Jul 2015 – Payments to British Atlantic Financial Services policy holders started last week and one report to Magnetic Media is that the customer in question received 25% of the cash value of their life insurance plan.It means the liquidation process is done and that, the forecast that the losses would be huge, by the Managing Director of the Financial Services Commission, Kevin Higgins was on point. BAFSL gave a vigorous fight in order to salvage the company, but Higgins told media: “Unfortunately because US interest rates went down so low the company was not able to meet the guaranteed interest rate given to policy holders.” It was said BAFSL was 6.2 million dollars in the red and at one point the PNP Administration had weighed in; asking for some leniency and proposing to bail out the indigenous company which was owned by the Methodist Church. Notices went out on Monday and policy holders have been streaming in to collect what is left of their savings after a liquidation process by PriceWaterhouseCoopers. We expect to have more on this in another newscast. Facebook Twitter Google+LinkedInPinterestWhatsApp IMF report gives warning and suggestion to refund insurance company clients Related Items:bafsl, fiancial services commission, liquidate, policy holders, pricewaterhousecooperscenter_img Surplus but no savior in PNP Administration for BAFSL Recommended for youlast_img read more

Weve gotten used to new technology that comes alo

first_imgWe’ve gotten used to new technology that comes along and renders obsolete the old tech it displaces. But there are also plenty of instances where the new meshes nicely with the old, changing the world in amazing and unforeseen ways. That’s what I thought when I stumbled across an article from BusinessWeek about a five-employee startup company in Maine called Advanced Infrastructure Technologies (AIT). This outfit unites innovative new materials with one of humanity’s hoariest engineering accomplishments: the construction of the arched bridge. Specifically, the company has designed a system that allows for the building of a new bridge in as few as 10 days, with no heavy equipment involved. What’s more, these structures—because they offer greater protection from corrosive factors like weather and salt—are projected to have a longer life than those made with traditional construction techniques. Although materials are a bit costlier, that’s more than offset by savings in labor. AIT’s technique involves using concrete-filled, carbon fiber-reinforced polymer composite tubes. Many people probably still think of carbon as the stuff that makes up the human body or the end of a graphite pencil, or what is left over after you burn paper. OK, most know that it also makes diamonds. But turning it into a fiber that’s strong enough to replace steel in bridge arches? That doesn’t seem possible. Yet it is. Here’s how the process—”Bridge in a Backpack,” as it’s known—works: CF is possible because of one of the peculiarities of carbon is that it can exist in a number of different forms (allotropes), depending on the way the atoms bond together. Each of these allotropes—which can be fashioned by nature into coal and by man into buckyballs and nanotubes—will have very different properties. For example, each carbon atom in a diamond is covalently bonded to four other carbons in a tetrahedron. These tetrahedrons together form a three-dimensional network of six-membered carbon rings. Graphite, on the other hand, consists of sheets of carbon atoms (“graphene” sheets) arranged in a regular hexagonal pattern. The structure of CF is similar to graphite, with the difference being in the way the graphene sheets interlock. One surprising fact is that while carbon fibers are generally thought of as a space-age material, their lineage actually dates back to the late 1800s. Thomas Edison used carbon fibers in his early light bulb filaments, which required the ability to conduct electricity while remaining fire resistant and capable of enduring the intense heat needed to create incandescence. In order to make the fibers, you start with a raw material, or precursor. Edison took a cellulose-based precursor such as bamboo and baked it at high temperature in a controlled atmosphere in a carbonization process known as “pyrolysys.” It’s similar to what we still do today. The technology took a long time to evolve. Bamboo and other such materials were not replaced as precursors until the introduction of rayon into the process in the late 1950s. That yielded the first high-tensile-strength fibers. Shortly thereafter, in the early 1960s, modern CF arrived with the discovery that polyacrylonitrile, derived from petroleum, was the ideal precursor. However, this early manufacturing process produced a fiber that was only 55% carbon. At present, polyacrylonitrile is still the source of 90% of the world’s carbon fiber, but purification has improved dramatically, with standardization of quality coming in 1990. The precursor is now stretched into long strands, and then heated to a very high temperature without allowing it to come in contact with oxygen. Without oxygen, the fiber cannot burn. Instead, the high temperature causes the atoms to vibrate violently until most of the non-carbon atoms are expelled. This method of carbonization leaves a fiber that’s nearly 100% carbon. Carbon fibers are relatively expensive when compared to similar products such as glass or plastic fibers, due to the manufacturing process being slow and energy intensive. But their properties—high stiffness, high tensile strength, low weight, high chemical resistance, high temperature tolerance, and low thermal expansion—make them desirable for particular applications, especially when combined with resins and molded. (If perchance you have some DIY home projects that might benefit from carbon fiber molding, you can have a go at it, beginning with this tutorial.) That is to say, CF by itself is an interesting material, but alone it’s of little value in structural applications. What really kicked its usage into high gear was what happened when it was added to different kinds of resins to create composites, generally termed “carbon-fiber-reinforced polymers” (CFRPs). You may remember the first composite tennis racquets, which revolutionized the game in the early 1980s. And as soon as they could, golfers of a certain age began choosing carbon fiber (usually mischaracterized as “graphite”) shafts instead of steel for their clubs, because the former are more forgiving and much easier on older bodies. Even before that, though, governmental and private aerospace efforts had been quick to embrace the possibilities. Carbon fiber composites’ favorable strength-to-weight ratio means weight savings of 20-30% over heavier metals. Thus it began to replace steel and aluminum—wherever possible consistent with safety—in airplanes and helicopters… a godsend for the Air Force. But commercial interests weren’t far behind. Weight reduction is everything in the airline business. A modern jet aircraft is apt to have carbon fiber all over the place: in its fairings, landing gear, engine cowls, rudder, elevators, flaps, fin boxes, doors, floorboards, and many other components. Much the same happened in extraterrestrial craft. CF has gone into space with NASA and on to the moon. Again, weight considerations are paramount when lifting off from the earth. But equally important is a lower ablation rate (i.e., the speed at which a material is stripped away by the friction of reentry), along with higher bulk density, superior mechanical strength, and high modulus (inelasticity). Carbon fiber composites—including carbon-carbon, which consists of CF-reinforced graphite—that have been densified fill the bill, and are used in nose tips and heat shields. The space shuttle was largely dependent on CF materials. CF/epoxy composites made up the payload bay doors and the shuttle’s remote manipulator arm. Likewise for satellites, which require high specific stiffness and dimensional stability to combat the large temperature swings in space. Thus similar composites are employed in fabricating antenna ribs and struts. Lately, there has also been much publicity about unmanned aerial vehicles (UAVs), or drones, as they are more commonly called. UAV bodies are likely to be made of CF materials. So are the gondolas and tail fins used in blimps. But carbon fiber is not only found in such esoteric arenas. It’s very much a part of the more grounded aspects of life. For example: Race cars—The sport has used the tech to create faster cars with lighter bodies. Among NASCAR and Formula 1 race cars, each of them has a body constructed from carbon fiber composites. Street wheels—While the cost of CF bodies for cars has put them beyond the reach of ordinary consumers (i.e., those who can’t afford Lamborghinis), that’s about to change. CF’s properties make it ideal for electrics, where lighter weight means longer distances between battery charges. BMW plans to be first to market with its electric city car, the i3, slated for release in 2014. Despite the higher cost of a CF body structure, the company will realize savings in the water and electricity needed to make it; thus the i3 will be marketed for about the same cost as conventional 3 Series models. BMW concedes the risk involved, but chances are it will not be the last company to make this leap. Sporting goods—We’ve already mentioned tennis racquets and golf clubs. But that’s just the beginning. CF has also become an integral part of such products as sailboats, rowing shells, canoes, bicycles, motorcycles, tripods, fishing rods, hockey sticks, paintball equipment, archery shafts, tent poles, protective helmets, pole vaulting poles, and pool cues. Shoe manufacturers use carbon fiber as a shank plate in some basketball sneakers to keep the foot stable. Music—Increasingly, CF is finding its way into such things as drum shells, bagpipes, and stringed instrument bodies. It also goes into high-end audio loudspeakers, and musical accessories such as violin bows and guitar pickguards. Building retrofits—CFRP can be applied to enhance shear strength of reinforced concrete by wrapping fabrics or fibers around the section to be strengthened. Wrapping a building column can also improve its ductility, greatly increasing the resistance to collapse under earthquake loading. Such seismic retrofit is a major and very cost-effective application in earthquake-prone areas, since it is much more economic than alternative methods. The use of ultra-high modulus CFRP is also one of the few practical methods of strengthening cast-iron beams, to which it can be bonded. Infrastructure—Prestressed concrete cylinder pipes (PCCP) account for the vast majority of water transmission mains in the US. But they are prone to corrosion and gradual deterioration. Failures of PCCP are usually catastrophic and affect large populations. But over the past decade, CFRPs have been utilized to line PCCPs internally, resulting in a strengthened structural system. Inside a PCCP, the CFRP liner acts as a barrier that controls the level of strain experienced by the steel cylinder in the host pipe. The composite liner enables the steel cylinder to perform within its elastic range to ensure the pipeline’s long-term performance is maintained. Medicine—The poster boy (at least, before his arrest on suspicion of murdering his girlfriend) for carbon fiber prosthetics was South Africa’s Oscar Pistorius, who ran in the Olympics on his CF legs. Weapons—CF can substitute for metal, wood, and fiberglass in many areas of a firearm in order to reduce overall weight. Carbon fiber is also a popular material in crafting the handles of high-end knives. Other consumer products (with the caveat that many of these currently are expensive vanity items)—These include such things as wallets, money clips, belts, corkscrew bodies, organizer trays, iPhone cases, license plate frames, attachés and briefcases, laptop stands, duffle bags, sunglass and eyeglass frames, toilet seats, luxury bathtubs, coffee tables, table lamps, pens, sushi plates, and, yes, cigar cutters. All of this merely scratches the surface. The fact of the matter is that carbon fiber has in a relatively short time become an integral part of modern life. New applications are popping up literally on literally a daily basis. Usage is expected to drive a $13+ billion/year business by 2015. That figure will be amplified a great deal as cheaper, more efficient manufacturing techniques are developed. If carbon fibers were suddenly to disappear, we’d be up the proverbial creek without a (CF) paddle… [Doug Hornig is a senior editor for Casey Extraordinary Technology.]center_img Whether AIT will be able to convince a sizeable chunk of the notoriously conservative construction industry that this is in fact a better approach remains to be seen. But so far, it has been involved in the construction of 13 bridges, mostly in Maine, Massachusetts, and Michigan. In any event, the unlikely image of bridge supports made out of fiber got me to wondering just what other uses there might be for this miracle material. I knew that my golf club shafts use it, for example, and that it’s in some car parts which used to be metal. But where else do we find it? Well, turns out that it’s just about everywhere. First, though, just what is it anyway? Carbon fiber, or CF, is a material made up of carbon atoms bonded together in crystals along the long axis into filaments about 5-10 μm (micrometers) in diameter. This is what one such filament looks like; it’s laid atop a human hair for comparison purposes.last_img read more

first_img— Kansas farm boy discovers rare technique to milk Wall Street for millionsOne transaction he found turned a very small stake into $64,250 in just 48 hours. His track record across his newsletter career includes 389 winners and counting… See why some are calling this the “most effective moneymaking technique” they’ve ever seen. Click here to see it explained. The Return of “Reagan Dollars” Decades after his presidency, the story of Reagan’s buried dollar replacement is now coming to light. And a new form of currency – one much like Reagan envisioned – is now emerging. See why “Reagan Dollars” are on an unstoppable path to becoming the world’s #1 currency… all starting as early as November 17. Click here for the full story. Recommended Link — A New EraLast century was the oil era. From Ibn Saud, Rockefeller, Getty, and even shale oil tycoons like billionaire Harold Hamm of Continental Resources, the oil business created trillions of dollars’ worth of wealth.Those days are over.Now, I’m not saying major oil companies are down for the count… they’re not. I’m also not saying billionaires like the Saudi royals are in trouble… they’re not.What I’m saying is that over the decades to come, those families, those billionaires, and those major companies we know today will not see their fortunes swell. They’ll chug along. They’ll also be surprised as new energy barons leap past them on the Forbes list.You see, oil goes in about every product we use today. From the tube of toothpaste to the lid on a Starbucks cup, it’s hard to get away from oil. This chart shows how much petroleum the world uses on a daily basis.I’m sure the first thing you think when you see this chart is that the oil business must be great.It is for the most entrenched players. Oftentimes, this means governments. After all, as much as 75% of the world’s oil production comes from state-owned oil companies, according to The Wall Street Journal.What I hope you’ll see is that the oil business isn’t getting much better. For starters, climate change warriors are out to attack the business at any chance they can get. I attended a raucous anti-oil protest in Portland, Oregon back in 2016 for research purposes. I attended a Dakota Access Pipeline protest in Portland, Oregon in November 2016Then take taxes into consideration. Every gallon of gasoline sold in the U.S. has a $0.184 federal levy placed on it… and some states, like Pennsylvania (the highest case), pile on as much as $0.582 per gallon on top of that. States need that money to fund their bloated budgets.Oil is under attack from every angle.Meanwhile, alternative power gets the opposite treatment. In some states, you can actually make money driving an electric car or bolting solar panels onto your home.Just to be clear, we don’t have an opinion about which energy source is better. In my newsletter Strategic Investor, we separate our ideology from our investing.With this in mind, we see the oil trade as old, tired, and predictably stale. We see alternative energy as inevitable.center_img Justin’s note: Today, we’re sharing a new essay from Strategic Investor editor E.B. Tucker, who just uncovered one of the biggest shifts of our time…As E.B.’s about to show you, our world is transitioning away from using oil as its primary power source. A new type of energy is taking over—and it’s opening up a huge profit opportunity… By E.B. Tucker, editor, Strategic InvestorA society is only as strong as its access to supplies of reliable energy. While the source of that energy changes over time, one thing doesn’t. Controlling the supply of that energy is as close to printing money as you’ll ever get.Throughout time, the richest barons in history sold society its energy.Last century, oil fueled society. Barons like John Paul Getty made so much money supplying society with oil, the wealth became a burden. From the Rockefellers to the Saudi royals, the story is the same. Controlling the supply of energy is equivalent to a levy on the entire economy.Before oil, it was coal. Coal created scores of 19th-century fortunes. Even Andrew Mellon, who later became Secretary of the Treasury and the third-largest taxpayer in the 1920s behind Rockefeller and Ford, got his start in the coal business.The same trend stretches all the way back to medieval days, when wood provided heat, a cooking flame, and lit rooms. The lords who owned the forest set the price for warmth, hot food, and light.Today we’re on the dawn of a new era in energy. Recommended Link E.B. Tucker Editor, Strategic InvestorP.S. I just released a new video describing everything you need to know about “America’s Third Power Shift.”In short, the biggest power shift in the last 100 years is happening now. And it’s creating a tipping point in the next generation of energy metals. If you know where to put your money ahead of time, you could see once-in-a-lifetime gains. We’re set up to profit from this megatrend in my Strategic Investor newsletter, and you can join.Click here to watch this important presentation…Reader MailbagToday, high praise for Casey’s new blockchain expert Marco Wutzer and his Disruptive Profits newsletter…I’m very excited about your portfolio recommendations, and really appreciate your expertise, intelligence, and great writing—you definitely provide the best overview of the crypto/blockchain world that I have encountered. Thank you so much! —DariusDisruptive Profits is our first-ever advisory dedicated to explosive projects in the up-and-coming blockchain space. You can sign up today right here.In Case You Missed It…Until now, 99% of the largest hedge funds and banks wouldn’t touch pot. That’s about to change… The “Trillion Dollar Mainstream Marijuana Takeover” begins as soon as November 6.And well-positioned investors could see gains of 7,500%… 9,329%… even 12,547% if these companies get taken over. Click here to learn more about this rare opportunity. Simply Put, Batteries Will Be the Oil of the Next CenturyAnd the metals that make up these batteries are already creating a new “gold rush.”Why now?Because these more advanced batteries will hand forward-thinking investors the opportunity of a lifetime—and make two things a reality:1) Electric vehicles will be cheaper than those with combustion engines. Estimates says that 4.5 million new electric vehicles will be sold every year in China alone by 2020.2) Solar and wind power will be even cheaper and—more importantly—be available on-demand, 24/7 (think streaming), thanks to the energy storage capabilities of high-tech batteries. This will lead to the rise of micro-grids and independent home energy.You see, new battery technology is cutting costs in half… while increasing storage capacity.And that’s why the mass production and adoption of the electric car is no longer a pipe dream. It’s a reality.Right on the Cusp of a Surge Earlier, we showed you a chart of oil usage. While it’s a big number, it’s not growing very fast. At least, compared to this chart…Oil’s 1.5% annual demand growth over the last two decades is nothing compared to surging demand for battery capacity.The chart measures battery demand in gigawatt hours (GWh). To put things into perspective, in 2016, all consumer products with lithium-ion batteries added up to 45 GWh, according to The Economist. That means every cordless drill, smartphone, and even e-cigarette combined. Electric car batteries produced that year added another 25 GWh.By 2030, management consulting firm McKinsey & Company expects demand for battery capacity to surge more than 36-fold to 2,900 GWh per year.And that, in turn, will create a massive spike in demand for a handful of new energy metals required to make all these batteries.In fact, The Wall Street Journal says, “The world is about to experience its biggest shift in commodities demand since the 19th century.”There’s no comparison. New energy sources will leap over oil’s tepid growth in the coming years. With clean energy economic incentives in place, no protesters, and technology on its side, a new energy source powers the future.Regards,last_img read more